dvd ripper

Search for a DVD Ripper

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OGMRip

I found OGMRip late, but included it here to provide one more option. I didn't actually run the program myself so I can't give it a rating, but the website gives a good overview and a number of screenshots so you should be able to get a good feel for what it can do. The main downside to this one for me is the lack of any deb package. Of course it can be installed from the command line, but I prefer to stick to the Debian packaging system wherever possible so I can more easily manage updates.

Thoggen

Thoggen has promise, but it's currently still in beta and it shows. I used version 0.4.2-2.

Like K9Copy, Thoggen aims to provide a very simple interface that still gets the job done. But unlike K9Copy, it supports transcode to a single file. Thoggen currently only supports the Ogg Theora format, but it is based on GStreamer and the website indicates other formats are likely to be added in the future.

Thoggen Encode

Thoggen's progress while ripping a DVD.

Once complete, Thoggen will likely rival K3b, but for now it is very slow (the developer acknowledges this) and I could not get the rip to finish. As time passes and bugs are fixed it will definitely be worth reconsideration, especially if you are a Gnome user. Because of the beta status I will decline to provide a rating at this time. Hopefully you will have more success with it than I did.

Search for a DVD Ripper

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Conclusion

While I've given away the ratings already, I thought it would be useful to summarize my final thoughts. What I found over the course of writing this article is that while there is no one clear app for everyone, Linux offers many useful tools to do the job. And it's an easier job than you might expect.

The keys areas for most apps to improve is in creating a single click rip and transcode, better default settings that don't have to be changed by most users, and fixing the known bugs. If more work is put into these three areas then GNU/Linux DVD rippers will finally reach their potential.

I chose K3b as the best DVD ripper because of its clear and attractive interface and its ability to get the job done quickly with minimal fuss and configuration. dvd::rip adds the subtitle feature that is missing from K3b, but goes a step farther to be the only app I found that includes a cluster mode to harness the power of multiple machines on your home network.

If copying a DVD from one physical disk to another is your method of choice then I would look no further than K9Copy. It's simple, easy, and effective.

My final app mention is Thoggen. Its beta status clearly showed during my tests, but the idea and organization of the program makes it a strong future candidate, particularly if you are a Gnome user.

Search for a DVD Ripper

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DVD's are great and I've spent more money than I care to count on them, but if you are like me and have more movies than you can remember, a few TV series spread out over too many discs, or a desire to watch in whatever way is most convenient, you start to wish for a better way to watch. For many of us that means moving our DVD's to hard drives so we can watch them where and when we want. It sounds reasonable and should be straight-forward, but for many it's still a mystical art that takes knowledge and patience.

Today makes the first full length review on Linux App Finder, and I'm please to report that ripping a DVD to your hard drive has never been easier, and you if you are a KDE user you might already have one of these programs installed and not even know it. Eights apps were compared on their ability to rip and transcode a DVD, with a special focus on ease of use. A ninth, Drip, was originally going to be included in the review, but it had missing dependencies in Debian unstable and I was unable to install it.

My Search for a DVD Ripper

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I'm currently in the process of writing a comparison of available DVD ripping programs for GNU/Linux. I picked the best contenders that I'm aware of and compared their features and ease of use. The goal was finding the best app for converting the main movie of a DVD to a single file playable on any computer and the winner is a surprising one (at least to me since I almost didn't include it). As a bonus I threw in a few apps targeted at creating DVD ISO's for burning back to a rewritable disk. Hopefully it will be ready to go within a week. Keep an eye on the News RSS feed for an announcement.

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